Tag Archives: sam pink

Hurt Others by Sam Pink

8 Jan

hurt others frontOh man, it just had to happen. Someone had to be a bagger at a grocery store and fantasize about hitting children in the head with wine bottles. Someone had to fear a puddle floating at him from across the street. Someone had to celebrate beating up a pregnant woman. Someone just HAD to be a nanny, and stare at giant motorized spiders.

Jeez oh man!

Don’t ask why a teenager in a Chicago Bulls overcoat is feeding baby rabbits to a toad. Don’t ask why someone had to run around the backyard with a bedsheet cape after drinking moonshine. And don’t ask why jumping down stairs feels like success.

Just sit back, drink a piss-infused Bloody Mary, and learn to hurt others.

Order Hurt Others from Amazon
Order Hurt Others from Powell’s
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Rontel by Sam Pink

8 Jan

rontelWe now enter: Total Isolation              

Rontel is the story of one man’s odyssey through Chicago. Follow him as he attempts to go to his last day of work. Follow him through the subway as he considers stealing chips from a dancing baby. Find him being threatened by a homeless man holding board games. Take his hand as he considers building a hydraulic cocoon for his cat out of a complimentary duffel bag. Walk the streets of Uptown as a cop-killer takes hostages to the roof of an apartment building. Meet his friends. Just kidding! Follow him to his neighbor’s apartment where he gets paid in pumpkin pie to watch a baby. Follow him through through the dull pains of never quite becoming an adult. Sit back, laugh, smile, hold your breath, because not even he knows how it ends.

Praise, Coverage, etc. for Rontel

“Funny as hell, searingly honest, and urgently real, Sam Pink’s Rontel puts to shame most modern fiction. His writing perfectly captures the bizarre parade that is Chicago, with all its gloriously odd and wonderful people. This book possesses both the nerve of Nelson Algren and the existential comedy of Albert Camus.” – Joe Meno, author of Hairstyles of the Damned

“I earnestly thought ‘this is the funniest book I have ever read’ or ‘Rontel is the funniest book I have ever read’ probably ~200x while and after reading Rontel.” – Tao Lin, author of Taipei

Los Angeles Review of Books
Toronto Review of Books
Vol. 1 Brooklyn
Chicago Review
Another Chicago Magazine
Verbicide Magazine
Chicago Center for Literature and Photography
The Huffington Post
A Rontel-inspired animation
An excerpt at Electric Literature’s Recommended Reading
Microcosm Publishing: 2013’s Top Things Made of Words
Karmaloop: 5 Awesome Books That Prove Books Are Still Worth Reading

Paperback edition published by Lazy Fascist Press. Digital edition published Electric Literature.

Order Rontel from Amazon
Order Rontel from Powell’s
Order Rontel from Barnes & Noble

Witch Piss by Sam Pink

8 Jan

WitchPissfinalcoverI noticed it was beginning to get dark. And for a couple seconds, it was scary-like that meant the world was breaking, or expired, or bruised, or something worse. It was really scary for a couple seconds but then I calmed down. Up above, the moonlit clouds looked rippled, like the ribcage of some giant thing digesting me.

And I wondered if the direction I was going went down into the digestive system or up out of it. Wondered what difference it made. There was a bug hovering over a small pool of ice cream on the sidewalk. Like a firefly, but it wasn’t a firefly. And I could’ve stepped on it and killed it. But I didn’t. Be thankful, little bug. For in my world, you are just a little bug.

Select Reviews, Excerpts, and Other Coverage

Dazed and Confused
Bookslut
The Fanzine
Another Chicago Magazine
HTML Giant
HTML Giant (2)
Atticus Review
Muumuu House
Ampersand Review
Hobart: Jordan Castro’s Best of the Year
Verbicide Magazine: Top 11 Books of the Year
That Lit Site
Screaming with Brevity

Order Witch Piss from Amazon
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Person by Sam Pink

8 Jan

person front cover 111

You see him at the liquor store. You see him at the bus stop, trying to look at you without being seen. Who is he? He is a person. In this debut novel, a person walks around Chicago contemplating the possibility of starving to death on purpose. He has sex with his neighbor. He goes out to look for a job but just buys little plastic dogs from homeless people instead. Who is the person? The person is you. The person is me. The person is sitting in his room shooting an empty pellet gun at his face, feeling the slow exhaustion of a Co2 cartridge. The person sits in a bathtub reading his roommate’s yearbook. He wants to create a contract mandating worldwide friendship. Person invents new and splendid ways of not getting along. You will read this book and remember why you mainly read books that have sex in them. You will become . . . a person.

Praise for Person

“How can you tell a story that is about nothing? Sam Pink’s Person, the Bizarro equivalent of Albert Camus’ The Stranger (as if The Stranger wasn’t already strange enough), does just that. Person is written in the first person, and it’s about a person, living in Chicago. That’s it — or at least, that’s about as much as we can say about it. Take this sentence though: “I live in Chicago and I don’t get along with a lot of people and the reasons are always new and wonderful.” It’s poetry that reads like a book — or maybe vice versa. This is existentialist Bizarro Literature at its finest.” – Flavorwire

“A phenomenal achievement.” – Mike Daily, author of Alarm and Valley

“If you read just one book this year, let it be Sam Pink’s Person.” – Electric Literature

“One of the most exciting, most inspiring novelists currently writing.” – Thought Catalog

“It made me laugh and my hair stand on end.” – HTML Giant

“Sam Pink is dictator of the island of the bizarre.” – As You Recognize Your Transience

“…there’s a troubling build-up of rage and self-destructive desire that makes Person incredibly unsettling. In other words, he’s a great example of why I carry Mace. – The Fanzine

“It’s a compulsive page-turner […] There’s something infectious, I think, about the honesty of the book, in how it relates the sometimes unflattering aspects of what goes on in a person’s daily life.” – The Faster Times

“A meditation on dissatisfaction, desperation, and loneliness…the sort of work that burrows into you and roots down.” – Housefire

Additional Praise and Coverage

Read an excerpt from Person at Muumuu House
Person reviewed by Steve Roggenbuck
Person reviewed at The Scrambler
Person reviewed at The Fanzine
Interview with Sam Pink at Vice Magazine
Interview with Sam Pink at The Faster Times
Interview with Sam Pink on Other People

Order Person from Amazon
Order Person from Powell’s
Order Person from Barnes & Noble

Introducing Witch Piss, American Monster, and The Door That Faced West

14 Feb

We are proud to present our first releases of 2014. They are:

WitchPissfinalcoverWITCH PISS BY SAM PINK

The most essential minimalist author of the 21st century returns with his most harrowing masterpiece yet!

I noticed it was beginning to get dark. And for a couple seconds, it was scary-like that meant the world was breaking, or expired, or bruised,

And I wondered if the direction I was going went down into the digestive system or up out of it. Wondered what difference it made. There was a bug hovering over a small pool of ice cream on the sidewalk. Like a firefly, but it wasn’t a firefly. And I could’ve stepped on it and killed it. But I didn’t. Be thankful, little bug. For in my world, you are just a little bug.or something worse. It was really scary for a couple seconds but then I calmed down. Up above, the moonlit clouds looked rippled, like the ribcage of some giant thing digesting me.

Click here to order Witch Piss.

the door that faced westTHE DOOR THAT FACED WEST BY ALAN M. CLARK

A bloody, neo-pulp western with the moral compass of Camus, this is the latest novel from celebrated artist Alan M. Clark.

In the beginning of the nineteenth century, the two murderous Harpe brothers, loyal to one another but violently at odds, go on a year-long killing spree in the American frontier, dragging with them the three wives they share between them; women who form a triangle of dependency, loyalty, jealousy, hatred, betrayal, and love.

Click here to order The Door That Faced West.

american monsterAMERICAN MONSTER BY J.S. BREUKELAAR

A deeply original post-apocalyptic novel. Like William S. Burroughs set in Philip K. Dick’s California.

– Mommy? Are you there?

– Norma?

– Is everything all right?

– Everything’s fine. I just want to go home is all.

– Where are you?

– I already told you.

– Tell me again.

– Outside a pharmacy on the coast. It’s almost dawn and I’m barefoot.

– Barefoot?

– I don’t know if he’s the guy.

– When you find the guy, you can come home.

– I know. It’s just, the longer I’m here the more it…

– it hurts?

– And it’s just that we dropped I don’t know how many pills. Couldn’t you just come get me? You can drop me back, okay? I just need a break. I’d like to see

to hold, to touch, to have

to be

In the beginning, KALI I8 created Norma (a network operation requiring minimal access) with a singular goal: bring back the horn of the perfect male.

Spill City: the coast of a near-future California, newly broken from the continental United States. In a temporary calm between storms, Norma combs the exposed intestines of the human world for the Guy. The Guy, the horn, is the only way home. If home exists. If home ever existed.

The longer Norma stays, the harder it is to remember.

She is a woman, a mother, a harbinger, a vessel, a tool, a program. She can be written and unwritten over and over again until something, someone, sticks.

And people, humans, are starting to stick.

Mommy is not pleased.

Click here to order American Monster.

Books for Your Bloody Valentine #1: Rontel by Sam Pink

10 Feb

Last year, Lazy Fascist brought you a trio of fucked up books for Valentine’s Day. This year, we’re doing it again with Rontel by Sam Pink, The Humble Assessment by Kris Saknussemm, and Colony Collapse by J.A. Tyler. Over the next few days, we’ll be releasing information on each title, beginning with Rontel.

rontel-jacket-final-100dpiRONTEL BY SAM PINK

We now enter: Total Isolation

Rontel is the story of one man’s odyssey through Chicago. Follow him as he attempts to go to his last day of work. Follow him through the subway as he considers stealing chips from a dancing baby. Find him being threatened by a homeless man holding board games. Take his hand as he considers building a hydraulic cocoon for his cat out of a complimentary duffel bag. Walk the streets of Uptown as a cop-killer takes hostages to the roof of an apartment building. Meet his friends. Just kidding! Follow him to his neighbor’s apartment where he gets paid in pumpkin pie to watch a baby. Follow him through through the dull pains of never quite becoming an adult. Sit back, laugh, smile, hold your breath, because not even he knows how it ends.

“Funny as hell, searingly honest, and urgently real, Sam Pink’s Rontel puts to shame most modern fiction. His writing perfectly captures the bizarre parade that is Chicago, with all its gloriously odd and wonderful people. This book possesses both the nerve of Nelson Algren and the existential comedy of Albert Camus.” – Joe Meno

Click here to order RONTEL.

Click here to order the e-book, available from Electric Literature.

Electric Literature and Lazy Fascist Team Up for New Sam Pink Novel

8 Nov

Today, Electric Literature’s Recommended Reading published an excerpt from Rontel by Sam Pink. One of the coolest features of Recommended Reading is the single sentence animation inspired by the recommended work. For Rontel, Brandon Ray created the badass stop-motion short that you can watch below.

Rontel is due out on Valentine’s Day 2013. Lazy Fascist will publish the paperback while Electric Literature releases the digital edition. We’re pretty damn ecstatic about this partnership.

Look for Lazy Fascist at AWP in Boston (March 2013), pimping Rontel and our two other early spring releases, Colony Collapse by J.A. Tyler and The Humble Assessment by Kris Saknussemm.